Podcast

Uniquely Human Us

Dog-eat-dog Darwinism is questioned and a win-win future is offered here, with both optimism and realism. It’s an exciting ride…

Donna Eiby has had a career in the military, worked on billion dollar projects, has a number of undergraduate and graduate degrees and a PhD with a research focus on the intention of employers to train their workforce in what she calls “uniquely human skills”.

With education underpinning her life, Donna’s deep understanding of the value of the skills which make us human arises not only from her personal experience as her own “case study”, but also through rigorous research. She explores the value of these learnable skills and busts their accompanying myths both in the context of our success as individuals, as well as in today’s world of business and human capital.

In this episode Donna addresses how the Industrial Revolution caused us to see humans as a commodity, iPods and the role individualism plays in our sense of disconnection and the importance of developing the skills which make us human, including empathy and social intelligence.


https://www.linkedin.com/in/donna-patricia-ann-eiby-future-of-work/

https://www.thefutureworkskillsacademy.com/

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