Podcast

Disability & Sport: Fuelling the Fire

Sam McIntosh, in his very own unassuming, modest, quiet, sensitive way, is one of the most inspiring people I’ve ever met. When the three-time paralympian from Ocean Grove had the accident which resulted in his disability, his words to his desperately worried mother on the accident scene were: “I’m going to be the first person in a wheelchair to base jump into the Grand Canyon.” He already had a mental list of the things he was going to do as a person in a wheelchair. Yes - he has an uncanny ability, natural and unforced, to see silver linings and turn adversity into a “fire in his belly”.

Another gift Sam gives is openness and lack of judgement. Many of us feel ignorant around the topic of disability, and that ignorance and fear of offending can then lead to impaired or blocked conversations. As Sam said, “Disability isn’t talked about enough.”

Sam covers so many aspects of being human in this episode, from understanding our privileges, to his attitude and approach to goal setting (or Disney Kingdom – you’ll get it when you listen!) to community and how to “mentally take a breath”.

Sam will have you feeling great about life. Do yourself a favour - don’t miss this one.

www.sammcintosh.com

https://www.parallelsports.org


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